As the Nile River descends from the highlands of East Africa, deep in Egypt's south, on the West Bank of the Nile, near the town of Aswan, are the most colorful and splendid towns in the country. The Nubian Villages are all painted in the vibrant colors of the rainbow. The amicable Nubians migrated from Sudan around 8000 years ago to begin farming along the Nile, which is why they have a darker complexion. They have their own distinct language, which they never teach to outsiders.

Nubians

They originate from the early inhabitants of the central Nile valley, and they are considered to be one of the oldest ethnic groups in Africa. Nubians are known for great hospitality, kind nature, rich history, and culture. Nubians still speak the ancient Nubian language and it differs from tribe to tribe.

Nubian Houses

Vibrant splashes of color give life to Nubia’s bright and welcoming environment. Nubian villages’ homes are best known for their artsy colorful appearance. Taking a walk down Gharb Soheil feels like going for a walk through a kaleidoscope, with all shades and tints of the spectrum and the geometric patterns hugging the walls in colorful murals. 

Nubian Cusine

Nubia has one of the oldest cuisines in the world and it was passed down from one generation to another. If you want a taste of history you will find it in a Nubian dish passed down for more than 3000 years, then you must try the food of Nubia.

Enjoy your Day In Nubia

Many people spend about two hours there. You may even spend the night at one of the cozy bed and breakfasts there. Nubian women have a very proud background, and they may be the driving force behind Nubian culture living thus far. They boast about their crafts and sell traditional cuisine. They preserve their culture by telling their children ancient Nubian tales and legends, teaching them traditional Nubian dances and music, and marrying among themselves. Nubians continue to hold ancient Egyptian beliefs. They believe that hanging a crocodile body over the door of one’s home would protect its inhabitants from prying eyes, which is why you will most often discover crocodile mummified bodies on the doors of the hamlet.   Fishermen hunt crocodiles, fill them with straw and place them in front of their houses. They even draw crocodiles all over the place and may keep one or two in a cage for tourists to take photographs with. The Crocodylus niloticus was worshipped as evil, envious—a representation of the god Sobek during the reign of the pharaohs, which is why Nubians mummified the crocodile as a tradition to protect from evil.